Department of Sociology
The University
of
Hong Kong

YSOC0001/TSOC0001 Crime and Punishment in Hong Kong

2002-2003 Second Semester


CO-ORDINATOR

Harold Traver
Department of Sociology
KK 1211, K.K. Leung Building
e-mail: hhtraver@hkucc.hku.hk

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM
 

Tony W.K. Fung
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science
MW 523, Meng Wah Complex
e-mail: wingfung@hku.hk
  Roderic G. Broadhurst
Department of Sociology
KK 1213, K.K. Leung Building
e-mail: broardie@hkucc.hku.hk
  David Clarke
Government Chemist
HK Government Laboratory
e-mail: dgclarke@govtlab.gov.hk
 
David M. Hodson
Director, Centre for Criminology
KK 1210, K.K. Leung Building
crimctr@hkucc.hku.hk
  Y.K Chu
Department of Sociology
KK1217, K.K. Leung Building
ykchu@hkucc.hku.hk


Every year the Hong Kong criminal justice system routinely processes thousands of criminal cases involving theft, violence, drug trafficking, and other crimes.   How does this enterprise, which cost billions of dollars annually and employs thousands of persons, operate?  How effective is it in terms of controlling crime?  What factors influence the development of criminal justice policy?  What is being done to improve its effectiveness?  What challenges will it face in the future?  This course attempts to answer these questions.

Broadly speaking, this course examines the nature of crime and the administration of criminal justice in Hong Kong society.  The course focuses on how people respond to crime, the ways in which the government attempts to control crime, the role of forensic science in criminal investigation, and the use of punishment in the administration of criminal justice.  Topics covered in this course include: different types of crime; popular images of crime and criminals; criminal law and the definition of crime; the role of police in the prevention and control of crime; corruption and organized crime in Hong Kong and China; criminal investigation and forensic science; and the effectiveness of punishment and corrections in the control of crime.

By the end of the course students should be able to:

METHOD OF ASSESSMENT

The course will be assessed entirely on the basis of coursework.  There is no examination.  Starting in the third or fourth week of the semester, students will be given weekly short problem-based assignments to complete that will directly relate to the issues under discussion.  You will be asked to assemble these assignments into a portfolio that will reflect your understanding of the various topics under discussion.  Completion of all assignments, presentation and content will all count towards your final mark.

Assignment 1 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 2 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 3 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 4 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 5 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 6 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 7 (click here to download word file)
Assignment 8 (click here to download word file)

NOTES ON ASSEMBLING YOUR CRIMINAL JUSTICE PORTFOLIO

The course will be assessed entirely on the basis of coursework.  There is no examination.  From now on you will be given short problem-based assignments that will help to reinforce your understanding of some of the issues under discussion.  The following outlines the coursework requirements for Crime and Punishment:

We are quite flexible as to how you present what you have done during the semester.   Assignments may be presented in a variety of ways.  For instance, if we ask you to look at how crime is presented in the mass media we may suggest that you produce a 'short report' on what you found.   There is more than one way to write such a report.   For instance, you could cut out pictures from magazines or comic books and comment on them, or you could simply write a short essay reporting on what you have observed.    The choice is up to you.   What we are looking for is creativity and evidence of some original thinking.  We are not counting words, nor will we be necessarily impressed with the size of your portfolio or your use of computer graphics.  What counts is evidence of creativity, insight, interest, original thought, and effort.  Completion of all assignments, presentation and content will all count towards your final mark.

When you have completed all the assignments, assemble your material and bind it in whatever way that is convenient.  Hand it into the Department of Sociology, KK1208, on or before Wednesday, 14 May 2003.

SESSION TOPICS

The topics covered in this course are subject to change throughout the semester depending on the availability and interests of the individual lecturers.  However, topics topic covered in this course will include the following:

RECOMMENDED GENERAL TEXTBOOKS

There are no required textbooks for this course.  However, the books listed below provide a useful introduction to crime and justice in Hong Kong and other parts of the world.  We have also collected a number of articles that deal with various aspects of crime and justice in Hong Kong.  These articles have been bound together and placed in the Reserve Section of the Main Library under the title "Crime and Punishment in Hong Kong".  Your lecturers may also give you recommended readings throughout the semester.

Gaylord, M. and Traver, H. (eds.).  (1994).  Introduction to the Hong Kong Criminal Justice System.  Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. (out of print but available in the Main Library)

Senna, J. and Siegel, L. (2002).  Introduction to Criminal Justice, 9th Edition.  Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson. (available in the University Bookstore)

Siegel, L. (2000). Criminology, 7th Edition.  Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson. (available in the University Bookstore)

Wesley-Smith, P. (1998).  An Introduction to the Hong Kong Legal System.  Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.  (available in the University Bookstore).
 

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